jeudi 19 janvier 2017

You like it, you learn it: affectivity and learning in competitive social role play gaming [peer-reviewed article]

Brom, C., Šisler, V., Slussareff, M., Selmbacherová, T., & Hlávka, Z. (2016). You like it, you learn it: affectivity and learning in competitive social role play gaming. International Journal of Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning, 1–36. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11412-016-9237-3
A study (n=325) with a detailed methodology about 3 types of learning experiences :
  • a digital role-playing game mildly competitive
  • the same game without computer, with team role-playing
  • a workshop without game
Flow and positive affects were higher with both games than without game. Learning and slower forgetting were a little higher with both games than without game. There is no difference (affective or cognitive) between the 2 games.

The two games « instigated positive learning and also boost learning : a certain type of social role-playing game built around a specific form of debate (...) [with] mild competition, with a touch of collaboration, and team role-playing. » « In this study, [they] cannot separate the effect of mild competition from the effect of team roleplaying [and] perceived difficulty was not higher in the game conditions compared to the non-game condition, because there is some evidence that role-playing activities could present a burden for some learners. » « Team role-playing can be particularly effective when it gives learners a higher sense of control compared to the non-role-playing activity.»

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Notes: Competition can be positive in learning activities if :
  • "all participants have a reasonable chance of winning, 
  • the rules and criteria for winning are clearly specified, 
  • and competition is not intense (i.e., winning is relatively unimportant, there are no tangible rewards for winning and no consequences for/impacts on students' grades)."

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